JCWS Special Issue CFP: Teaching Introduction to Creative Writing

Theme: Teaching Introduction to Creative Writing

Deadline for Proposals: Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Guest editors: Abriana Jetté, PhD, Kean University and Brandi Reissenweber, Illinois Wesleyan University

Journal of Creative Writing Studies, a peer-reviewed, open-access journal, is seeking scholarship that examines the introductory creative writing course. Designed to initiate students into the foundational elements of creative writing, participants in the course will likely experience the discipline’s major pedagogical practice, the workshop. At the same time, the introductory course is uniquely situated to serve a variety of students, from those beginning serious study of the discipline to those in other fields who are curious about the craft. How do introductory courses serve different audiences and purposes? In what ways has creative writing pedagogy shifted based on cultural, aesthetic, critical, or institutional contexts? This special issue examines the teaching, practice, theory, and history of the introduction to creative writing course.

Journal of Creative Writing Studies is committed to publishing scholarship that is grounded in theory and/or research and invites examinations of creative writing that make use of various critical lenses to articulate pedagogical practices. Some possible topics, as they relate to the introductory course, might include:

• multi-modal and digital connections
• inclusive pedagogy
• interdisciplinary connections
• approaches informed by findings in neuroscience or cognitive science
• the introductory course as an act of social justice/source of public service
• community-based practices
• critical examination of individual course syllabi
• inquiries into the history and traditions of the introduction to creative writing course
• alternative assessment strategies
• the introductory course as a way to conceive literature and writing in a global context
• collaborative writing
• project-based or game-based pedagogy
• the rhetoric of introduction to creative writing
• genres to teach, approaches to teaching specific genres, and course sequences
• anti-intellectualism and the introduction to creative writing course
• the tension between providing a foundation for more advanced creative writing courses versus the general education artistic elective

Proposals for research-based articles should include:
1) an abstract that does not exceed 500 words
2) a minimum of 5 relevant scholarly citations that support the proposal’s description
3) your CV

Complete proposals and any questions should be sent to breissen@iwu.edu and abjette@kean.edu.

Special Feature: Critical Reflections

Critical reflections directly engage teaching the introductory to creative writing course. Critical reflections may take on alternative, creative structures that seek to disrupt dominant language ideology and are designed to expand our knowledge and understanding of what happens in the introduction to creative writing course. If proper permission has been granted, reflections might also include samples of student work. Sample syllabi or assignment descriptions will serve as helpful resources for critical reflection and should be included with the proposal. Proposals for critical reflections should include:

1) an abstract that does not exceed 250 words
2) a course syllabi or assignment description directly connected to the reflection
3) your CV

Complete proposals and any questions should be sent to breissen@iwu.edu and abjette@kean.edu.